Top Ten Airports in the world 2013

Posted on Aug 14 2013 - 5:14am by Ahsan

The following are the Top Ten Airports in the world 2013.

1. Singapore Changi Airport

2. Incheon International Airport

3. Amsterdam Schiphol Airport

4. Hong Kong International Airport

5. Beijing Capital International Airport

6. Munich Airport

7. Zurich Airport

8. Vancouver International Airport

9. Tokyo International Airport (Haneda)

10. London Heathrow Airport

1. Singapore Changi Airport

Changi International Airport, or simply Changi Airport, is the main airport in Singapore. A major aviation hub in Southeast Asia, it is about 17.2 km (10.7 mi) north-east from the commercial centre in Changi, on a 13 square kilometres (3,200 acres) site.

The airport, operated by the Changi Airport Group, is the home base of Singapore Airlines, Singapore Airlines Cargo, SilkAir, Scoot, Tiger Airways, Jetstar Asia Airways, and Valuair. As of May 2013, Changi Airport serves more than 100 airlines operating 6,400 weekly flights connecting Singapore to over 250 cities in about 60 countries and territories worldwide.[Until 30 March 2013, the airport served as a secondary hub for Qantas, which used Singapore as the main stopover point for flights on the Kangaroo Route between Australia and Europe. Qantas is the largest foreign airline to operate from the airport, with over two million passengers annually. An important contributor to the economy of Singapore, more than 28,000 people are employed at the airport, which accounts for over S$4.5 billion in output.

Changi Airport has three passenger terminals with a total annual handling capacity of 66 million passengers. Terminal 1 opened in 1981, followed by Terminal 2 in 1990 and Terminal 3 in 2008. The Budget Terminal, opened on 26 March 2006 and closed on 25 September 2012, will make way for Terminal 4 which will be ready by 2017.

In 2012, the airport handled 51.2 million passengers, a 10% increase over the previous year. This made it the seventh busiest airport by international passenger traffic in the world and the second busiest in Asia by international passenger traffic in 2012. The airport registered 4.92 million passenger movements in December 2012, a growth of 8.6% year-on-year. Changi’s daily record was broken on 22 December 2012, the Saturday before Christmas Day, with 180,400 passengers passing through the 24 hours. In addition to being an important passenger hub, the airport is one of the busiest cargo airports in the world, handling 1.81 million tonnes of cargo in 2012. The total number of commercial aircraft movements was 324,722 in 2012.

The airport has won over 430 awards since 1981, including 30 ‘Best’ awards in 2012. Changi Airport’s efforts to counter the onset of age include periodic physical upgrades to its existing terminals and building new facilities.

2. Incheon International Airport

Incheon International Airport is the largest airport in South Korea, the primary airport serving the Seoul National Capital Area, and one of the largest and busiest airports in the world. For seven years in a row (2005–2012), it was rated the best airport worldwide by Airports Council International.

The airport has a golf course, spa, private sleeping rooms, ice skating rink, a casino, indoor gardens and a Museum of Korean Culture. Airport authorities claim that average departure and arrival takes only 19 (60 minutes world-wide industry average) and 12 minutes (45 minutes) respectively, significantly lower than the rest of the world, making it one of the fastest airports in the world for customs processing. Its duty-free shopping mall has been rated the world’s best for three years in a row in 2012 by Business Traveler. Incheon International Airport also claims that it has only a 0.0001% baggage mishandling rate.

Located 48 km (30 mi) west of Seoul, the capital and largest city of South Korea, Incheon International Airport is the main hub for Korean Air, Asiana Airlines, Jeju Air and Polar Air Cargo. The airport serves as a hub for international civilian air transportation and cargo traffic in East Asia. Incheon International Airport is also currently Asia’s eighth busiest airport in terms of passengers, the world’s fourth busiest airport by cargo traffic, and the world’s eighth busiest airport in terms of international passengers in 2010. In 2011, 35,062,376 passengers used the airport.

The airport opened for business in early 2001, replacing the older Gimpo International Airport, which now serves mostly domestic destinations plus shuttle flights to alternate airports in China, Japan, and Taiwan.

3. Amsterdam Schiphol Airport

Amsterdam Airport Schiphol is the Netherlands’ main international airport, located 20 minutes (4.9 NM (9.1 km; 5.6 mi)  southwest of Amsterdam, in the municipality of Haarlemmermeer. The airport’s official English name, Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, reflects the original Dutch word order (Luchthaven Schiphol). The airport used to have the IATA code of SPL, which has fallen into disuse and has been replaced by AMS.

The airport is the primary hub for KLM as well as for Arkefly, Corendon Dutch Airlines, Martinair and Transavia. The airport also serves as a European hub for Delta Air Lines and as a base for Vueling. Schiphol is considered to be an airport city. The airport occupies an area of 13 square kilometres (3,200 acres).

Schiphol opened on 16 September 1916 as a military airbase, with a few barracks and a field serving as platform and runways. When civil aircraft started to use the field (17 December 1920) it was often called Schiphol-les-bains. The Fokker aircraft manufacturer started a factory near Schiphol airport in 1919.

By 1940, Schiphol had four asphalt runways at 45-degree angles, all 1020 meters or less. One was extended to become today’s runway 4/22; two others crossed that runway at 52.312°N 4.800°E.

Schiphol’s name is derived from a former fortification named Fort Schiphol which was part of the Stelling van Amsterdam defence works. Before 1852, the Haarlemmermeer polder in which the airport lies was a large lake, in the shallow waters of which sudden violent storms could claim many ships. This was the main reason for reclaiming it. In English, Schiphol translates to ‘Ship Grave’, a reference to many ships lost in the area.

Schiphol’s main competitors in terms of passenger traffic and cargo throughput are London Heathrow Airport, Frankfurt Airport, Paris-Charles de Gaulle Airport and Madrid-Barajas Airport.

In 2010, 65.9% of passengers using the airport flew to and from Europe, 11.7% to and from North America and 8.8% to and from Asia; cargo volume was mainly between Schiphol and Asia (45%) and North America (17%).

In 2010, 106 carriers provided a total of 301 destinations on a regular basis. Passenger destinations were offered by 91 airlines. Direct (non-stop) destinations grew by 9 to 274. Regular destinations serviced exclusively by full freighters (non-passenger) grew with 8 to a total of 27.

Schiphol has six runways, one of which is used mainly by general aviation aircraft. The northern end of the Polderbaan, the name of the last runway to be constructed, is 7 km (4.3 mi) north of the control tower, causing lengthy taxi times (up to 20 min) to the terminal. Plans have been made for a seventh runway.

The airport is built as one large terminal (single terminal concept), split into three large departure halls, which converge again once airside. The most recent of these was completed in 1994, and expanded in 2007 with a new part, named Terminal 4, although this part is not recognised as a separate building. Plans for further terminal expansion exist, including the construction of a separate new terminal between the Zwanenburgbaan and Polderbaan runways that would end the one-terminal concept.

Because of intense traffic and high landing fees, some low cost carriers decided to move their flights to smaller airports, such as Rotterdam The Hague Airport and Eindhoven Airport. Many low cost carriers like EasyJet continue to operate from Schiphol, using the low-cost H-pier.

Schiphol is the home base of Arkefly, Corendon Dutch Airlines, KLM (Royal Dutch Airlines), Martinair and Transavia. Schiphol was the home base of Amsterdam Airlines, which ceased operations on 31 October 2011

The Schiphol Air traffic control tower, with a height of 101 m (331 ft), was the tallest in the world when constructed in 1991. Schiphol is geographically one of the world’s lowest major commercial airports. The entire airport is below sea level; the lowest point sits at 11 ft (3.4 m) below sea level (or 4.5 ft (1.4 m) below the Dutch Normaal Amsterdams Peil (NAP)); the runways are around 3 m (9.8 ft) below NAP.

Schiphol is equipped with 18 double jetway gates in preparation for airlines introducing the Airbus A380. Emirates was the first airline to fly the A380 to Schiphol in August 2012, deploying the aircraft on its daily Dubai-Amsterdam service.

4. Hong Kong International Airport

Hong Kong International Airport is the main airport in Hong Kong. It is located on the island of Chek Lap Kok, which is largely reclaimed for the construction of the airport itself. The airport is also colloquially known as Chek Lap Kok Airport (赤鱲角機場), to distinguish it from its predecessor, the closed Kai Tak Airport.

The airport has been commercially operational since 1998, replacing the former Kai Tak Airport, and is an important regional trans-shipment centre, passenger hub and gateway for destinations in Mainland China (with over 40 destinations) and the rest of Asia. The airport is currently the world’s busiest cargo gateway and one of the world’s busiest passenger airports.

The Hong Kong International Airport is also home to one of the world’s largest passenger terminal buildings (the largest when opened in 1998). It is operated by the Airport Authority Hong Kong, 24 hours a day, and is the primary hub for Cathay Pacific, Dragonair, Hong Kong Airlines, Hong Kong Express Airways and Air Hong Kong (cargo). The airport is one of the hubs of Oneworld alliance, and it is also one of the hubs of Asian-Pacific cargo hubs for UPS Airlines. It is a focus city for many airlines, including China Airlines and China Eastern Airlines, which serves 18 flights to Hong Kong per day (one direction) from 15 cities. Virgin Atlantic, United and Air India use Hong Kong as a stopover point for flights respectively from London to Sydney, from Tokyo to Singapore and Ho Chi Minh City as well as from India to Osaka and Seoul.

HKIA is an important contributor to Hong Kong’s economy, with approximately 60,000 employees. About 90 airlines operate flights from the airport to over 150 cities across the globe. In 2012 HKIA handled 56,057,751 passengers, making it the 12th busiest airport worldwide by passenger traffic.It also surpassed Memphis International Airport to become the world’s busiest airport by cargo traffic.

The airport has a total of 66 boarding gates, with 66 jet bridge gates (1–4, 15–71, 501–510, 511–513, 521–524) and seven virtual gates (5–11) which are used as assembly points for passengers, who are then ferried to the aircraft by apron buses. Of the 66 jet bridges, five (Gates 15,60,62,64,66) are capable of handling the Airbus A380. Singapore Airlines, Emirates, Qantas, British Airways (begins 22 Oct 2013), Malaysia Airlines, Korean Air (ends 27 Oct 2013) and Thai Airways . China Southern Airlines once deploy A380s to/from Beijing Capital International Airport.

5. Beijing Capital International Airport

Beijing Capital International Airport (IATA: PEK, ICAO: ZBAA) is the main international airport serving Beijing. It is located 32 km (20 mi) northeast of Beijing’s city center, in an enclave of Chaoyang District and the surroundings of that enclave in suburban Shunyi District. The airport is owned and operated by the Beijing Capital International Airport Company Limited, a state-controlled company. The airport’s IATA Airport Code, PEK, is based on the city’s former romanized name, Peking.

Beijing Capital has rapidly ascended in rankings of the world’s busiest airports in the past decade. It had become the busiest airport in Asia in terms of passenger traffic and total traffic movements by 2009. As of 2012, Beijing Capital International Airport is the second busiest airport in the world in terms of passenger throughput behind Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. The airport registered 557,167 aircraft movements (take-offs and landings), which ranked 6th in the world in 2012. In terms of cargo traffic, Beijing airport has also witnessed rapid growth. By 2012, the airport had become the 13th busiest airport in the world by cargo traffic, registering 1,787,027 tonnes.

Beijing Capital International Airport is the main hub for Air China, the flag carrier of the People’s Republic of China, which flies to around 120 destinations (excluding cargo) from Beijing. Hainan and China Southern Airlines also use the airport as their hub.

To accommodate the growing traffic volume, Beijing Capital added the enormous Terminal 3 in 2008 in time for the Olympic Games, the second largest airport terminal in the world after Dubai International Airport’s Terminal 3, and the fifth largest building in the world by area.

6. Munich Airport

Munich Airport is an international airport located 28.5 km (17.7 mi) northeast of Munich, Germany, and is a hub for Lufthansa and Star Alliance partner airlines. It is located near the old city of Freising and is named in memory of the former Bavarian Prime minister Franz Josef Strauss. The airport is located on the territory of four different municipalities: Oberding (location of the terminals; district of Erding), Hallbergmoos, Freising and Marzling (district of Freising).

Between 1995 and 2006, passenger numbers doubled from under 15 million per annum to over 30 million, despite the impact of the 11 September attacks in 2001 and 2002. In 1996, the airport overtook Düsseldorf as Germany’s second busiest airport and currently handles almost twice as many passengers as the country’s third busiest airport. However (once the new airport opens), Berlin is expected to catch up in terms of passenger numbers. Munich Airport serves as Lufthansa’s second hub in Germany besides Frankfurt.

Munich Airport is the second busiest airport in Germany in terms of passenger traffic behind Frankfurt Airport, and the seventh busiest airport in Europe, handling 38,360,604 passengers in 2012. It is the world’s 12th busiest airport in terms of international passenger traffic, and was the 27th busiest airport in the world in 2011.

7. Zurich Airport

Zurich Airport is known as Kloten Airport, is Switzerland’s largest international airport, and the principal hub of Swiss International Air Lines. It serves Zurich, Switzerland’s largest city, and, with its surface transport links, much of the rest of the country.
The airport is owned by Flughafen Zürich AG, a company quoted on the SIX Swiss Exchange. Major shareholders include the canton of Zurich, with 33.33% of the shares, and the city of Zurich, with 5% of the shares. No other shareholder has a holding exceeding 5%. Skyguide is responsible for all Air Traffic Control for Zurich.
The airport is 13 kilometres (8 mi) north of downtown Zurich, in the municipalities of Kloten, Rümlang, Oberglatt, Winkel and Opfikon, all of which are within the canton of Zurich.


The airport is served by the A51 motorway and o​​ther main roads, which provide access to the airport especially for the central and eastern Switzerland.
Zurich Airport railway station is located underneath the terminal. The station has frequent Zurich S-Bahn services on lines S2 and S16, plus direct InterRegio, InterCity and Eurocity services to Basel, Bern, Biel/Bienne, Brig, Geneva, Konstanz, Lausanne, Lucerne, Munich, Neuchâtel, Romanshorn, St. Gallen and Winterthur. There are some 10 trains per hour to Zürich Hauptbahnhof, Zurich’s main city centre station, with a journey time of between 10 and 15 minutes. By changing trains at Hauptbahnhof, most other places in Switzerland can be reached in a few hours.

In front of the terminal is a regional bus station and the airport stop of the Stadtbahn Glattal, a light rail system. Both bus station and light rail stop provide service to destinations throughout the Glattal region that surrounds the airport, with the light rail stop being served by Zurich tram routes 10 and 12.

8. Vancouver International Airport

Vancouver International Airport is located on Sea Island in Richmond, British Columbia, Canada, about 12 km (7.5 mi) from Downtown Vancouver. In 2011 it was the second busiest airport in Canada by aircraft movements (296,942 and passengers (17.0 million, behind Toronto Pearson International Airport, with non-stop flights daily to Asia, Europe, Oceania, the United States, and Mexico, and other airports within Canada.

The airport has won several notable international best airport awards; it won the Skytrax Best North American Airport award in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 the second, third, fourth and fifth time respectively it has received the honour (the first was in 2007). It is the only North American Airport included in the top 10 for 2013. YVR also retains the distinction of Best Canadian Airport in the regional results.

It is a hub for Air Canada, Air Canada Express and Air Transat as well as a focus city for WestJet. Vancouver International Airport is one of eight Canadian airports that have US Border Preclearance facilities. Vancouver International Airport (YVR) has been named, “The Best Airport in North America”. The airport also made the list of top 10 airports in the world, rated at 9th overall, for the first time in 2012. In 2013 it is rated 8th overall worldwide. It is also one of the few big international airports to have a terminal for scheduled floatplanes.

Vancouver International Airport is owned by Transport Canada and is managed by Vancouver Airport Authority, which also manages other airports around the world through its Vancouver Airport Services subsidiary.

9. Tokyo International Airport (Haneda)

Tokyo International Airpor Tōkyō , commonly known as Haneda Airport  or Tokyo Haneda Airport Tōkyō Haneda   is one of the two primary airports that serve the Greater Tokyo Area in Japan. It is located in Ōta, Tokyo, 14 km (8.7 mi) south of Tokyo Station.

Haneda handles almost all domestic flights to and from Tokyo, while Narita International Airport handles the vast majority of international flights. In 2010, a dedicated international terminal was opened at Haneda in conjunction with the completion of a fourth runway. This allowed for a dramatic increase in international flights going to Haneda, which previously had only “scheduled charter” flights to Seoul, Shanghai, Hong Kong and Taipei. The Japanese government plans to further expand Haneda’s international role in the future.

Haneda handled 66,795,178 passengers in 2012. By passenger throughput, it was the second busiest airport in Asia and the fourth busiest in the world, after Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson Airport, Beijing Capital Airport (Asia’s busiest) and London Heathrow Airport. With Haneda and Narita combined Tokyo has the third busiest city airport system in the world, after London and New York City.
Haneda is the primary base of Japan’s two major domestic airlines, Japan Airlines (Terminal 1) and All Nippon Airways (Terminal 2), as well as low-cost carriers Hokkaido International Airlines, Skymark Airlines, Skynet Asia Airways, and StarFlyer. It is able to handle 90 million passengers per year following its expansion in 2010.
In December 2009, ForbesTraveller.com recognized Haneda Airport as the most punctual airport in the world for two years in a row, with 94.3% of its flights departing on time and 88.6% arriving on time.

10. London Heathrow Airport

London Heathrow Airport or Heathrow is a major international airport serving London, England. Located in the London Borough of Hillingdon, in West London, Heathrow is the busiest airport in the United Kingdom and the third busiest airport in the world (as of 2012) in terms of total passenger traffic, handling more international passengers than any other airport around the globe. It is also the busiest airport in Europe by passenger traffic and the third busiest by traffic movements, with a figure surpassed only by Paris-Charles de Gaulle Airport and Frankfurt Airport.Heathrow is London’s main airport, having replaced RAF Northolt and the earlier and better-known Croydon Airport, and together with Gatwick, Southend, Stansted, Luton and London City, London is the busiest city airport system in the world by passenger traffic (with 133,666,888 passengers travelling through the six airports); and second only to New York City in terms of traffic movements. The airport sustains 76,600 jobs directly and around 116,000 indirectly in the immediate area,and this, together with the large number of global corporations with offices close to the airport, makes Heathrow a modern aerotropolis which contributes an estimated 2.7% to London’s total GVA.

The airport is owned and operated by Heathrow Airport Holdings, which also owns and operates three other UK airports,and is itself owned by FGP TopCo Limited, an international consortium, which includes Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec and GIC Special Investments, that is led by the Spanish Ferrovial Group. Heathrow is the primary hub for British Airways and the primary operating base for Virgin Atlantic.

Heathrow lies 12 nautical miles (22 km; 14 mi) westo of Central London, and has two parallel east–west runways along with four operational terminals on a site that covers 12.14 square kilometres (4.69 sq mi). Terminal 5 was officially dedicated by Queen Elizabeth II on 14 March 2008 and opened to passengers on 27 March 2008. Construction of a new Terminal 2 complex to replace the old terminal building and adjacent Queen’s Building began in 2009 with the first phase expected to open in 2014.Terminals 3 and 4 underwent major refurbishments between 2007 and 2009. In November 2007, a consultation process began for the building of a new third runway and a sixth terminal, which was controversially approved on 15 January 2009 by UK Government ministers.The project was subsequently cancelled on 12 May 2010 by the Cameron Government.

The airport holds a Civil Aviation Authority Public Use Aerodrome Licence (Number P527), which allows flights for public transportation of passengers or for flying instruction.

 

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